Monday, August 31, 2015

Does Media Define Gender Roles?

by Debbi Dachinger

In an attempt to simplify the complicated nature of men and women, society has allowed media to define and otherwise perpetuate gender stereotypes that dumb down the human experience. And, in its attempt to elevate one gender, denigrate the other. From books and magazines to television programs to radio and films to video games and online communities, media drives our understanding of gender. As a woman, still in a predominantly men-make-more money based society, I am hyper aware of the influence media can have on us all.

By presenting us with images and voices of women, men, and relationships, media advances the ideals of what is desirable in women and men. These ideals are, at best, suffocating stereotypes because they present society with how men and women-and children-are "supposed" to be. But there are small victories that suggest some of us have had enough of the status quo.

There will always be a fraction of people who refuse to act as equal partners in any relationship and/or work-life situation. However, I hold out hope that those of us who value the men and women-and children-in our lives can unite in our efforts to champion a realistic depiction of gender roles.

According to the first step in effecting lasting change is to start the conversation. Nurture your voice. Speak out if you notice media's portrayal of men being incapable of being equal partners with the women in their lives.

In March 2015, at the United Nations on this subject, came this: "In moving forward on the post-2015 goals, advancing gender equality was as much a political as a personal agenda, said the conversation's moderator, Noelene Nabulivou, speaking on behalf of Diverse Voices and Action for Equality (DIVA), the Executive Committee of Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era (DAWN) and the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN-Women) Asia Pacific Regional Civil Society Advisory Group.  Achieving gender equality and empowerment required stretching and breaking gender stereotypes, including for women, lesbian,
gay, bisexual and transgender people, she said."

What makes effective for positive gender roles is its support in the numbers of men and women hosts. In addition it is a woman owned and operated which  has no bias on age. You will find younger hosts, middle aged, as well as, older hosts who offer tremendous wisdom and education to all.  Sharing your wisdom is also encouraged  on When you are listening to your favorite radio programs on Radio (  and you're invited as a listener to call in and ask a question or voice your opinion, please feel free to do so. Radio can influence equality? For starters, the presence of women on the radio, television and in print is more likely to provide positive role models for women and girls. It also enables women to gain the confidence as sources of interviews. You will also find that HRN ( Radio Network) has an extensive by veteran women media professionals. In addition, conscious efforts are made to portray women and men in non-stereotypical situations.  

Even today a very small percentage of women occupy leadership positions in traditional radio networks. HRN proves that excellence is not limited by gender. The media does have an important role in shaping society. Support HRN as it helps shape our society and world in positive leadership for all.

Debbi Dachinger hosts Dare to Dream  at WED, 11 AM PT

Monday, August 24, 2015

HealthyLife.Net Years Ahead of Emerging Positive Media Curve

In 2002, a pioneer in positive media, commenced its positive radio talk network to provide a balance against the negativity, sensationalism and controversy of traditional media. It was definitely what people were trending towards because today, by 3rd party analysis, has 1700% more listeners than any traditional digital radio station.

One of's purposes was to pave the way for other positive media. Recently a wave of media alternatives focused on presenting a positive, balanced view of the world are now coming into play. is ecstatic at the possibility that traditional media is finally beginning to question their negativity and its result.

According to the BBC website Charlie Beckett, former editor of Channel 4 News and director of journalism think-tank POLIS, highlighted positive and solution-focused news sections in the likes of traditional media and the rise of alternatives such as Positive News, ( started a Weekday Positive News Show in 2007) as a challenge to traditional news values. Beckett said that there is an ingrained belief in mainstream media that news has to be about something broken, violent or disturbing, which runs so deep that it's almost the unconscious of the craft. He went on to potently share: Journalists are questioning the fundamentals of news itself. But change is beginning to stir at a deeper level, he said. Even the toughest of mainstream newsrooms are aware that the old editorial certainties are being questioned.

In the Huffington Post Positive News editor, Seán Dagan Wood, is quoted as saying he believed that relentless bad news was leaving audiences feeling disempowered "We are reaching peak negativity in the news," he said. "The overall narrative that the media creates is no longer serving us and it's increasingly at odds with our evolving sense of who we are, what works and what's possible."

According to Arianna Huffington, founder of the Huffington Post, recently
announced a global editorial initiative in this space: "If we don't cover positive stories, ideally with the same relentlessness and the same resources that we cover negative stories, we're basically not giving our readers the full truth," said Huffington. "We're giving them a very jaundiced view of human nature."  Interestingly, stories that reinforce faith in human nature are shared three times more on the Huffington Post than the combined average of all other sections on the site.

According to The United Kingdom's, statistics show that audiences are fatigued by the repetition of stories of misery and violence in foreign news.  "The news agenda as it stands has disturbing consequences," warned Dr Denise Baden, who has researched social psychology in relation to the news. "It leads to helplessness. It leads to a lack of agency. It leads to mental health issues," she said.

In today's ever changing world, reliable ethical media has a responsibility to expose positive stories and potential solutions. It's not enough to just inform people about what's going wrong because it fosters a negative focus without balance. Unfortunately nowadays  this is the way in which traditional media chooses to report. However, is not part of THAT paradigm.

Marketing agencies are expected to spend a total of $540 billion worldwide on advertising in 2015, led by a 15.7 percent growth in digital media. Yet advertising dollars in traditional television, newspapers and magazines are either in decline or show stunted gains. This offers some proof that traditional media is not maintaining its audience and thereby not satisfying its ad clients needs. Ostrich in the sand, just 'make the money' business media executives are missing the old standard universal media law that does maintain audience and ad dollars - CONTENT IS KING. Combine that with the majority of people not wanting all that sensationalism, negativity and controversy and Positive Media stands out with its content AND consistent, growing audience. is the King and Queen of Positive Media leading their audience to new ideas, solutions and possibilities of a happy, healthy life. With its live, on-demand and podcast download shows and 62 channels of syndicated/simulcast distribution to 130 countries and all 50 U.S. States, it has a massive audience. The time is right to consider advertising or sponsoring a show on's All Positive Media. So for a positive experience please consider us for your next advertising buy.  Contact John at 310-483-1436,

Monday, August 10, 2015

How Positive Radio can Bring about Community

While internet access is growing throughout the world, radio remains an important and widespread medium in which to reach affluent, as well as, poor and marginalized communities in countries around the world.

Radio builds community, when it is made by and for members of a community, then it becomes an empowering tool. For instance, is positive radio streaming 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. listeners are a like-minded community committed to living a happy, healthy life through self-development, self-care and the attention of taking care of our planet and our people.

 A. Positive Attributes  of Radio

* Offers a wide array of formats (program types) to reach listeners for a positive state of mind, with complementary shows and messages.

* Allows easy, immediate delivery to worldwide listeners simultaneously.

* Program genres and variety are audience driven so the listener does not need to seek programming elsewhere.

*  Captures local, regional, national and global audiences.

* Produces one of the highest levels of reach to the Cultural Creative Consumer Market as well as to the South Bay consumer local and traditional radio consumer markets.

* 62 different distribution channels covers the multiple devices that people utilize to listen: in cars, on internet, wifi, mobile via  computer, smartphone, tablet, smartTVand private radio networks.

* Positive media IS one of the most engaging of all media forms for the 'always feel good factor.'

* Can inform and educate people on all levels from beginner yo expert in a plethora of genres such as Natural Health & Fitness, Spirituality & Paranormal, Variety & Arts,
Inspiration & Motivation, Business & Community and Lifestyle.

B. How Builds Community

  1. Education and Improvement

  1. Communication and Information Sharing

  1. Cultural Promotion and Entertainment

  1. Individual Guidance and Information through Call-In Activity

  1. Top level expert radio hosts and guest.

  1. A wide variety of compelling radio programming on many subjects ofinterest, and all positive and upbeat. More than positive radio - a positive way to life.